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Contemplative works of art made of cicada wings, hair and thorn branches evoke rebirth and change

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art

#Carving
#Climate change
#Death
#Hair
#Insects
#Installation
#Medicine
#Nature
#social comment
#Wood

December 11, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Velo de luto (Mourning Veil)” (2020), Magicicada wings, sewn with hair, 32 x 47 x 2 inches. Photo by Robert Chase Heishman. All images © Selva Aparicio, shared with permission

Woven throughout Selva AparicioThe cicada veils and fringed flooring are the complexities of rebirth, transition and beauty faculty. Organic ephemera – human hair, thorny branches, eroded wings – become poignant installations and smaller works of art reflecting on a variety of global issues, including the climate crisis and the never-ending failures of the medical establishment.

Aparicio reports that her explorations of life and death began in childhood when she watched the natural world circulate through growth and decay in the forests outside Barcelona. This enduring fascination has crystallized in the artist’s work, especially in pieces like “Velo de luto (Funeral Veil)”, in which 1,365 seventeen-year-old cicada wings are sewn together with strands of hair from two generations of women. The shrouds are usually worn in honor of a deceased spouse, and Aparicio notes that the material and shape exemplify “the fragility of the wing veil decays, as does the patriarchal veil of history it represents”.

“Childhood Memories” (2017), hand-carved carpet on oak floor, 657 square meters. Photo by the artist

Overall, the artist says that her “practice has evolved beyond the individual to capture ecological, social and political activism and evoke the change and rebirth that I experience in nature.” The “childhood carpet”, for example, connects the personal Memory and a household object with bigger issues like covering and uncovering trauma.

Similarly, Aparicio quotes her own experiences in “Hysteria,” an installation that surrounds an antique gynecological table with a curtain of thorny branches. The artwork largely comments on the unjust power dynamic inherent in traditional health care, and makes a direct correlation between the invasive and painful processes of medicine for women and their ability to bring new life into the world.

Although she spends half of her time in Barcelona, ​​Aparicio is currently in Chicago and has seen work in two locations: Her piece “Hopscotch” is part of MCAGroup exhibition The long dream, during her solo exhibition hysteria is by International Museum of Surgical Sciencewhere the artist lives. Both are scheduled to close on January 17, 2021 Instagram also for insights into Aparicio’s process.

“Velo de luto (Mourning Veil)” (2020), Magicicada wings, sewn with hair, 32 x 47 x 2 inches. Photo by Robert Chase Heishman

“Childhood Memories” (2017), hand-carved carpet on oak floor, 657 square meters. Photo by the artist

“Hysteria” (2020), ligature-woven branches of thorns and 1931 Hamilton Obstetrics, 9 x 4 x 6 feet. Photo by Robert Chase Heishman

“Hysteria” (2020), ligature-woven branches of thorns and 1931 Hamilton Obstetrics, 9 x 4 x 6 feet. Photo by Robert Chase Heishman

“Velo de luto (Mourning Veil)” (2020), Magicicada wings, sewn with hair, 32 x 47 x 2 inches. Photo by Robert Chase Heishman

“Hysteria” (2020), ligature-woven branches of thorns and 1931 Hamilton Obstetrics, 9 x 4 x 6 feet. Photo by Robert Chase Heishman

“Hysteria” (2020), ligature-woven branches of thorns and 1931 Hamilton Obstetrics, 9 x 4 x 6 feet. Photo by Robert Chase Heishman

#Carving
#Climate change
#Death
#Hair
#Insects
#Installation
#Medicine
#Nature
#social comment
#Wood

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