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Tulle swaths from site-specific installations by Ana María Hernando

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#Installation
# location-specific
#Textiles

March 1, 2021

Grace Ebert

“Solo se escuchaba el aire” (2020), tulle, wood, metal, 125 x 120 x 258 inches. Installation at Château de la Napoule, La Napoule Art Foundation, France. Photo by Sebastian Collett. All images © Ana María Hernando, shared with permission

Fueled with a feeling of rebellion, yards of colorful tulle cascade out of windows and stairs in site-specific installations by Ana María Hernando. The soft, pliable material breaks the existing architecture and engulfs trees in meshes, creating works that are both visually striking and subversive.

The tulle is reminiscent of ball gowns and pieces of clothing traditionally worn by women and explodes into a flood of fabric to break with the social constructions surrounding femininity. “As a Latina, I explore how the feminine manifests itself in strength and flexibility, in beauty and in (an) unstoppable abundance of generosity,” says the Argentine artist.

Although she has worked with a range of materials, Hernando shares that there is always a textile element in her that “appears to be an expansive conduit for my work,” referring to her childhood in Buenos Aires, where she met women in watched her family sew and crochet and embroider together every day. She explains:

The things they made of cloth and thread were expressions of their spirit. All the beauty – the hours of work, the washing and ironing – was made invisible once the table was set and stained with food. I explore the unconfirmed feminine power of work as a prayer that I have known all my life.

Hernando works mostly in Boulder, although she has spent much of the year in a forest on the South Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee. She is represented by Robischon Gallery, Shark color, and Moving art. If you’re in Colorado, check out the artist’s multidisciplinary projects over the coming months as part of Gift box In the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art and in a solo exhibition in September Denver Botanic Gardens. In 2022 you can find them at Sun Valley Art Museum and Denver Robischon Gallery. Until then, discover an archive of your tufted, textile-based projects her side and Instagram. (over Cross Connect magazine)

“Waterfall” (2020), a temporary tulle installation in the Château de la Napoule of the La Napoule Art Foundation, France. Photo by Rachel Berkowitz

“Waterfall” (2020), a temporary tulle installation in the Château de la Napoule of the La Napoule Art Foundation, France. Photo by Rachel Berkowitz

“Flood (Déferlante)” (2020), tulle, installation at Château de la Napoule, La Napoule Art Foundation, France

“Lantern” (2020), tulle, wire and wood. Château de la Napoule, La Napoule Art Foundation, France, with Nelcy Mercier

“Unmoored from the Familiar Expectations” (2020), performative installation in the Château de la Napoule of the La Napoule Art Foundation, France, with Christopher Kojzar and Alessandro Sciaraffa. Photo of Rachel Berkowtiz

Photo by Sebastian Collett

#Installation
# location-specific
#Textiles

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