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Interview: Arinze Stanley talks about the inextinguishable effects of police brutality and how extreme emotions are the key to change

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art
Colossal

#Activism
#Drawing
#emotions
#hyperrealism
#portraits

“Bullets and Denim # 2” (2020), charcoal and graphite on paper, 30 “by 26”. All images © Arinze Stanley, shared with permission

Nigerian artist for several years Arinze Stanley ((before) was at the forefront of hyperrealism with its powerful and sometimes surreal portraits that amaze in size and emotion and in which it discusses a new interview supported by Colossal members. His charcoal and graphite work is faithfully reproduced and carries broader political messages, particularly regarding state-sanctioned violence and his own experiences with police and military brutality.

What people don’t realize Balls and denim The artwork is emotional in all places, but if you get a shot in the head you should be dead, right? Well, these people in the photo are not dead. That sums up the concept of perseverance in general. Even if we try to sew the stains of our reality, I want people to see that we got it on our heads. Enough is enough. It’s a visual representation of enough is enough, because from here on is death.

The colossal editor-in-chief Grace Ebert came to Stanley for a conversation in March 2021 about how he brings his subjects to points of extreme frustration, how his drawings are well received by various viewers around the world, and how he envisions his works of art as catalysts for meaningful change.

“The Machine Man 1” (2019), pencil on paper

#Activism
#Drawing
#emotions
#hyperrealism
#portraits

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