Blog

In an extensive exhibition, two indigenous artists will be brought together to explore the power of socially committed art-making

.

art

#Animals
#Collaborative
# found objects
#Installation
#portraits
#Sculpture

“Each / Other” (2021), around 700 headscarves, approximately 16 x 9 feet, a collaboration between Marie Watt and Cannupa Hanska Luger

A monumental patchwork wolf, warriors grappling with a fang snake, and an abstract wool rug made from restored blankets are made up of One / other: Marie Watt and Cannupa Hanska Luger, that opens this weekend in Denver Art Museum. The expansive exhibition of 26 mixed media sculptures, installations and wall hangings connects two of the leading indigenous artists who work today in a way that distinguishes both the threads and nuances in their works.

In the center of the room is the 16-foot creature the couple created together by making about 700 patterned headscarves that were filed around a steel armature by an international crew. The collaborative installation entitled “Each / Other” physically ties the individual works of art by Watt and Luger together, making use of the socially engaged aspects inherent in both practices.

Cannupa Hanska Luger, “Every One” (2018), ceramics, social collaboration, 12 x 15 x 3 feet. Image courtesy of the Marie Walsh Sharpe Contemporary Art Gallery at the Ent Center for the Arts, UCCS, Colorado Springs, Colorado

Based in New Mexico, Luger is a multimedia artist of Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara, Lakota, and European descent whose projects often address contemporary life in indigenous communities. For example, his 2018 piece “Every One” lined up 4,096 ceramic beads to create a pixelated portrait of a young figure. Each sphere represents one of the women, girls, queer and trans people who were murdered or disappeared in Canada.

wattA member of the Seneca Nation with Scottish and German heritage, uses everyday objects steeped in historical narratives and collective memory. The Portland-based artist works primarily with materials sourced from the community, such as blankets sewn together in sewing circles.

After his run in Denver ended on August 22nd Each other will visit them Michael C. Carlos Museum in Atlanta from September 25th to December 12th 2021 and the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem from January 29th to May 8th 2022. Find out more about Luger and watt on their websites.

Marie Watt (Seneca), “Butterfly” (2015), reclaimed woolen blankets, satin weave, thread, cotton twill ribbon and tin bells, 94 x 126 inches. Image © Marie Watt

Cannupa Hanska Luger, “This is not a snake” (2017-2020), ceramics, fiber, steel, oil barrels, accordion wire, ammunition cans, garbage, found objects, 78 x 36 x 600 inches. “The One Who Checks & The One Who Balances” (2018), ceramics, combat equipment, Afghan industrial wool felt, bead embroidery by Kathy Elkwoman Whitman; 6-1 / 2 feet x 12 inches x 8 inches (approximately each). Image © Cannupa Hanska Luger, courtesy of the Heard Museum, Craig Smith

Marie Watt “Companion Species (Radiant)” (2017), crystal and western maple base, 8 x 27 x 16 inches. Image © Marie Watt and Kevin McConnell. Made in association with Jeff Mack, Glassblower and the Corning Museum of Glass Hot Glass Team in association with the Rockwell Museum, Corning, New York

Cannupa Hanska Luger “Mirror Shield Project” (2016), drone operation / performance organization by Rory Wakemup., In the Oceti Sakowin camp, Standing Rock, North Dakota

#Animals
#Collaborative
# found objects
#Installation
#portraits
#Sculpture

Are such stories and artists important to you? To become something Colossal member and support independent art publishers. Join a community of like-minded readers who are passionate about contemporary art and support ours Interview series, get access to partner discounts and much more. Join now!






Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *