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Sandstone pillars on the other side appear like totems made of billowing fabric

photography

#Erosion
#scapes
#Nature
#Stone

June 14, 2021

Grace Ebert

All images © Zac Henderson, shared with permission

A collection of Entrada sandstone developed in a remote region of Utah 140 to 180 million years ago. Wind, rain, and other elements have shrunk the formations over time, creating tall pillars that look more like a bundled fabric than ancient minerals.

For his series Draped stone, Photographer Zac Henderson documents these spectral columns, or Hoodoosformed when layers of hard and soft rock are eroded, creating smooth, undulating patterns with age. Today’s structures flow in gentle waves from the walls and appear as ambiguous objects camouflaged by thick strips of fabric. Henderson describes his encounter with the pillars:

It’s almost like fabric being draped over boulders to protect them from the elements. In a different way, the rocks look almost comical to a stereotypical ghost costume and only need eyes to complete the ensemble. It’s strange that something so opposite to the fabric should take on a fabric-like appearance, but here we encounter a highly whimsical type of muslin that almost invites us to look underneath.

Henderson travels frequently, looking for the unusual textures and colors of the earth’s landscapes, and you can follow his adventures on his way Behance and Instagram. Prints of some pieces of Draped stone gives up too his side.

#Erosion
#scapes
#Nature
#Stone

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